Marthe Mortensdatter[1]

Kvinde 1826 - 1905  (79 år)


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  • Navn Marthe Mortensdatter 
    Født 15 okt. 1826  Budolfi Ålborg, Fleskum, Ålborg Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  [2
    Døbt 23 okt. 1826  Hjemmedåb Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  [2
    • Fremstillet i kirken d. 14. oktober 1827
    Køn Kvinde 
    Død 27 nov. 1905  Richfield, Sevier, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  [3
    Begravet ca. 4 dec. 1905  Richfield City Cemetery, Richfield, Sevier County, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  [4
    Person-ID I11000  Djurhuus-Wendelboe-Meinertsen-Nielsen
    Sidst ændret 27 maj 2020 

    Far Peder Mortensen 
    Mor Dorthe Johansen 
    Familie-ID F3999  Gruppeskema  |  Familie Tavle

    Familie Hans Olsen,   f. 25 mar. 1828, Rødledshuset, Brorfelde Skov, Brorfelde, Kvanløse, Merløse, Holbæk Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted,   d. 3 jul. 1912, Richfield, Sevier, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  (Alder 84 år) 
    Børn 
    +1. Hans Peter Hansen,   f. 4 jan. 1866, Richfield, Sevier County, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted,   d. 2 jul. 1905, Richfield, Sevier, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  (Alder 39 år)
    +2. David Hansen,   f. 21 jul. 1870, Little Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted,   d. 10 mar. 1952, Richfield, Sevier, Utah, USA Find alle personer med begivenheder på dette sted  (Alder 81 år)
    Gravsten
    Gravsten for Hans Olsen og Marthe Mortensdatter
    Gravsten for Hans Olsen og Marthe Mortensdatter
    P.S. Det korrekte fødselsår for Marthe Mortensdatter er 1826
    Sidst ændret 27 maj 2020 
    Familie-ID F3997  Gruppeskema  |  Familie Tavle

  • Dokumenter
    Passagerliste fra sejlskibet Monarch of the Sea, som sejlede fra Liverpool d. 16. maj 1861, og som ankom til New York d. 16. juni. Ombord var Christen Olsen, hans bror Hans Olsen og dennes kone Marthe
    Passagerliste fra sejlskibet Monarch of the Sea, som sejlede fra Liverpool d. 16. maj 1861, og som ankom til New York d. 16. juni. Ombord var Christen Olsen, hans bror Hans Olsen og dennes kone Marthe

  • Notater 
    • Information supplied to the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers by Printha H. Stewart, Martha's granddaughter, from history written by Printha's sister, Elda H. Johnson.

      My grandmother, Martha Mortensen Hansen was born October 15, 1826 at Aalborg, Denmark. She was the daughter of Peder Mortensen and his second wife, Dorthea Marie Johansen Jaeger Mortensen. It is known only that she had one brother, Carl Frederich Mortensen, who was christened September 6, 1829. She married Hans Olsen Hansen in Brodfelt, Denmark in 1854. He was born in Brodfelt, Denmark, March 25, 1828. He was the son of Olsen Hansen and Karen Christensen Hansen. They heard humble missionaries tell of a new religion. They believed its truths and were baptized members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints on November 8, 1857. When they became Mormons, their entire way of life changed. Their friends turned against them and they sought associations with the people who were also Mormons. In those early days of the Church, the missionaries from Utah were instructed to encourage the newly converted Saints to emigrate to Utah to strengthen the Church in Zion. The spirit of 'gathering' was preached along with the gospel. So it was that Hans and Martha left their native homeland in 1861 and arrived in Liverpool, England, ready to embark on an entirely new way of life. On May 16, 1861 they sailed from Liverpool bound for America on the sailing vessel "Monarch of the Sea". Jabez Woodward, with Hans O. Hansen and Niels Wilhelmaen, assisting, were the leaders of the 955 saints on board. Monarch of the Sea was one of the largest ships sailing the Atlantic at that time and was able to carry more passengers. It arrived in New York harbor June 19, 1861, having spent 31 days on the ocean. After they got out of quarantine customs they made their way by crowded trains to Florence, Nebraska where they were to be provided with wagons to take their belongings on to Utah though the people were expected to walk. They became part of the Samuel A. Woolley Company which consisted of some 338 souls with 70 wagons to the group. Martha and Hans were strong and healthy and looked with eager anticipation to walking over a thousand miles to the Great Salt Lake Valley where they would be establishing a new home. The Woolley Company left Florence July 13 and arrived in the Valley September 22, 1861. They made their first Utah home in Little Cottonwood and remained there only a short time until President Brigham Young called them to move to Sanpete County. In 1864 they joined 12 other families and moved to Richfield, a new settlement further south in sparsely settled Sevier County. Here their first home was a dugout. It was in this humble abode where Martha Hansen, at the age of 38 experienced the joy of motherhood for the first time. She gave birth to Hans Peter Hansen (my father) on January 4, 1866. The story goes that when grandmother was still in bed after the birth of this little babe, a heavy rain fell causing a flood. The muddy water ran so deep in the dugout that it floated the bed. What a mess. On account of trouble with the Indians this family returned to Little Cottonwood where they remained for four years. Another son, David, was born July 21, 1870. In the fall of 1870, President Young advised them to go back to Richfield and make their permanent home. Under the leadership of Joseph A. Young the people were given the privilege of taking up land. The men worked hard to get the irrigation system started to water their crops, dig ditches and canals with only picks and shovels. The crops looked fine but hordes of grasshoppers moved in on the fields and consumed every living spear of grain. The people did everything they could to combat this enemy but they were helpless. The crops were a total loss and the settlers were reduced to near starvation. It was this winter that the Hansen family lived entirely on potatoes and molasses. Hans in a joking way would say, "Well, what's for supper?" The story is told that they were so hungry for meat that Hans traded Martha's wedding ring for a piece of pork the size of his two hands. Martha was so afraid of the Indians that were always snooping around that she would rather accompany Hans into the field and help grub brush rather than stay home in their little dugout alone with the children. As soon as possible Hans provided a better, more comfortable home for his family, which was greatly enjoyed by Martha. Her granddaughter, Elda H. Johnson, says that her grandmother was a very good cook and kept her house neat and clean. But contrary to most pioneer women, she did no spinning, weaving or sewing. She was a small, quiet, easily satisfied woman, seldom out of sorts. She did not learn to speak or write the English language so her associations were somewhat limited. They received their endowments on February 23, 1869 in the Endowment House. They were interested in the welfare of their people and did the endowment work and sealing for many. In 1874 they drove an ox team to Salt Lake City to get their citizenship papers which were so important to them. The trip took three weeks. Grandmother lived to be 78 years old, passing away on November 27, 1905 and was buried on Thanksgiving Day in the Richfield Cemetery. Grandfather Hans lived on until July 3, 1912 when he died at the age of 84 years and was lovingly laid to rest beside his companion of 51 years.
      [1]

  • Kilder 
    1. [S3283] Jette Mejnertsen.

    2. [S3108] Kirkebøger AO, Budolfi Ålborg, Fleskum, Ålborg, 1819-1831, KM, opslag 89, folio 76.

    3. [S4268] Josephine Elizabeth Westman Hansen, daughter-in-law to Hans Olsen Hansen.

    4. [S3854] findagrave.com.